MisInterpreted Too
thisisteen:

#readbannedbooks

thisisteen:

#readbannedbooks

readmore-worryless:

"Too many books?" I believe the phrase you’re looking for is "not enough bookshelves".

rknickme:

ilovecharts:

Banned Books By The Numbers

via Hitchcockismyhomeboy Tumb

Stats on book banning / challenges. Charts make the world go round.

nicholasdunnes:

winkbooks:

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter — Notes from the Zombie Apocalypse

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter
by Lost Zombies
Chronicle
2011, 160 pages, 8 x 10 x 0.5 inches
$15 Buy a copy on Amazon

Some of my favorite things about zombie movies are the details of the changed world. The dead grass, broken windows, toppled telephone poles, abandoned cars with missing wheels and trunks left open, boarded-up buildings, spent ammo shells, and other signs of struggle and desperation serve to create a fascinatingly creepy environment.

And that’s why I like Dead Inside: Do Not Enter so much. The book consists entirely of letters, hand-written warnings, and pages torn from journal entries that were written during the zombie pandemic. The notes are on matchbooks, napkins, photographs, advertisements, shopping lists, road maps, scraps of cardboard, and gum wrappers. Some of the notes are written with pen and pencil, others are written with lipstick, burnt wood, crayons, and blood.

The messages of the notes themselves tell the tale of the rise of the zombie pandemic, from tentative, joking questions about a “really bad flu,” escalating to confused panic, and later to grim acceptance of the new reality that the survivors now must live in.

In the introduction to Dead Inside, we learn that these notes had been found in a Dora the Explorer backpack. The first note presented in the book was written by the man who killed the owner of the backpack, a girl who was about 10 years old and had been bitten by a zombie (but had not yet turned into one). The man wrote “I opened her backpack and found all these notes and letters. This stuff is poisonous. No one in their right mind should read it. Reading this is like looking into the sun.” – Mark Frauenfelder

September 16, 2014

hopeheisagentleman

audreyheckburn:

“There are two qualities that make fiction. One is the sense of mystery and the other is the sense of manners. You get the manners from the texture of existence that surrounds you. The great advantage of being a Southern writer is that we don’t have to go anywhere to look for manners; bad or good, we’ve got them in abundance. We in the South live in a society that is rich in contradiction, rich in irony, rich in contrast, and particularly rich in its speech”                                                                                 -Flannery O'Connor

N O V E L S / N O V E L L A S
Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
Beloved by Toni Morrison
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
God’s Little Acre by Erskine Caldwell
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
Light in August by William Faulkner
Look Homeward, Angel by Thomas Wolfe
The Neon Bible by John Kennedy Toole
The Night of the Hunter by Davis Grubb
The Optimist’s Daughter by Eudora Welty
Other Voices, Other Rooms by Truman Capote
Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy
Sanctuary by William Faulkner
Sartoris by William Faulkner
The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Tobacco Road by Erskine Caldwell
The Violent Bear It Away by Flannery O’Connor
Wise Blood by Flannery O’Connor
S H O R T  S T O R I E S
A Good Man Is Hard to Find By Flannery O’Connor
A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner
Barn Burning by William Faulkner
The Flowers by Alice Walker
Kneel to the Rising Sun by Erskine Caldwell
Mountain Victory by William Faulkner
The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County by Mark Twain
Why I Live at the P.O. by Eudora Welty
P O E T R Y
Southern Gothic by Rickey Laurentiis
Playing Dead by Andrew Hudgins

audreyheckburn:

“There are two qualities that make fiction. One is the sense of mystery and the other is the sense of manners. You get the manners from the texture of existence that surrounds you. The great advantage of being a Southern writer is that we don’t have to go anywhere to look for manners; bad or good, we’ve got them in abundance. We in the South live in a society that is rich in contradiction, rich in irony, rich in contrast, and particularly rich in its speech”                                                  
                               -Flannery O'Connor
N O V E L S / N O V E L L A S

S H O R T  S T O R I E S

P O E T R Y

housingworksbookstore:

blackballoonpublishing:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

vintageanchorbooks:

HOW LONG IT TAKES TO READ THE WORLD’S MOST POPULAR BOOKS: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/how-long-it-takes-to-read-the-worlds-most-popular-books

My brain likes this like this.

This is almost too good.

I gotta go, I have some reading to do.

hello! I was wondering if you had any recs for books with nonbinary characters? It really makes me sad that I can't find ANY books where nb people are protagonists... thanks!
Anonymous

thegayya:

queermediarepresentation:

Yes, we do! No where near as many as we’d like, i’m afraid, but I can point you in the direction of a few at least. As someone who is cis and not non binary I apologize if I get anything wrong in the following recs. The recs below are a mix of non binary and genderfluid, I hope you don’t mind.

First is Static, with a genderfluid main character who can literally shift between male and female genders, we’ve written a review on it here if you want to check that out. There is also a trans character who’s in it pretty often. Make sure you pay attention to the trigger warnings because there are quite a few. I’m not 100% sure if this is what you want because the main character goes between identifying as male and female rather than being non binary. 

According to riptidepublishing “Blacker than Black by Rhi Etzweiler is a non-traditional vampire novel (they eat chi) set in a sort of dystopian future, and that features non binary characters who tend toward androgynous.”

Wallflower by Heidi Belleau is a new adult self-discovery/contemporary romance novel that features a genderqueer character. Again, not precisely non-binary, but the character explores being both male and female and ultimately does not put a label on anything. (description of this and blacker than black taken from Riptide’s tumblr.)

Every Day by David Levithan has a non binary character who switches bodies every day though I don’t think the fact that the character is non binary is touched on much, I haven’t read it personally so if anyone else knows let us know.

Xavin from the Runaways graphic novel series is an alien who doesn’t see gender in the same way as humans, while she uses her female form most she does take male form pretty often too. Xavin becomes romantically involved with Karolina who is a lesbian. 

Compared to the rec list I published earlier this is so short, and I’m sorry about that, I wish I had more for you. I’m opening this up to any followers who might know more so keep an eye on the tags in case they reblog this with suggestions.

-Lauren

Ooh, I’ve got some! Being non-binary myself, I make it a point to search out books that have them as protags. Unfortunately, there really just aren’t that many, buuuut I do have a few more. 

Brooklyn Burning by Steve Brezenoff - this is like MY BIBLE. I’m not even kidding. It’s a romance between two characters whose genders are never revealed. Neither are explicitly stated as non-binary, but it’s pretty clear they are both gender-variant. It is the best. THE BEST. 

Pantomime and Shadowplay by Laura Lam - this is a fantasy/steampunk with an intersex main character who is gender-variant, if not non-binary. I’ve only read Pantomime, but I really really loved it. 

Love in the Time of Global Warming by Francesca Lia Block - in this one, the character is a trans guy, but he never really explicitly defines it, and I read him as more non-binary than fully male-identified. Read our review of it here

Personally, I would not recommend Every Day, even though David Levithan is one of my favorite authors. I actually could not finish it, because the non-binaryness of the character was too tied into the fact that they constantly changed bodies…which was something that was forced upon them, and it caused a lot of difficulty, and they wanted it changed. So… I might feel differently while reading it now, but that was when I was still figuring out my identity, and that kind of narrative was too difficult to deal with. 

I hope that all helps! 

-V

readmore-worryless:

"Too many books?" I believe the phrase you’re looking for is "not enough bookshelves".

angelicsongx:

nihilisme:

ittybittylittleworld:

punkasslouis:

I just watched a kid break down in the bookstore because his books for the semester totaled $600 and that’s the american university system in a nutshell

I was on the verge of tears when I got to the cashier so yeah, that’s messed up

Go here and just, don’t waste any more money okay?

YES. I FOUND THE THING, IF ANYONE DOESN’T HAVE MONEY FOR COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS LIKE ME, THEN GO HERE OKAY?

ariestess:

lumpenspaceproletariat:

hobbitkaiju:

blackwaifu:

goldstarprivilege:

appropriately-inappropriate:

hellomissmayhem:

gaywitchesforabortions:

tehbewilderness:

the-fly-agaric:

bajo-el-mar:

Reading about abusive men and the way they think. Very unsettling and an incredible book so far. Here are my very professional notes.

what book is this?

This is from “Why Does He DO That” by Lundy Bancroft.

I’m so glad I’m seeing more and more Lundy Bancroft quotes on my dash because this book CHANGES THE LIVES OF ABUSE VICTIMS.The programs run for rehabilitating abusive men through the courts? Bancroft DESIGNED THEM. His programs are replicated ALL OVER THE WORLD.He literally wrote THE book on abuser rehabilitation.

Here’s a link to a pdf copy. If you haven’t read this book yet, read this book.

Can we talk about how it seems like the entirety of the book is online on PDF, this making it accessible to anyone with an internet connection?
That is how we stop abuse.
We enable everyone to know what it looks like, so that when it happens, they can shut it down.

Arm yrself with knowledge!

Changed my life, would reccomend.

I am reblogging about this book YET AGAIN because this book is THAT IMPORTANT. Read it, you will not regret it.

that link doesn’t work anymore, but here’s one that does

ariestess:

lumpenspaceproletariat:

hobbitkaiju:

blackwaifu:

goldstarprivilege:

appropriately-inappropriate:

hellomissmayhem:

gaywitchesforabortions:

tehbewilderness:

the-fly-agaric:

bajo-el-mar:

Reading about abusive men and the way they think. Very unsettling and an incredible book so far. Here are my very professional notes.

what book is this?

This is from “Why Does He DO That” by Lundy Bancroft.

I’m so glad I’m seeing more and more Lundy Bancroft quotes on my dash because this book CHANGES THE LIVES OF ABUSE VICTIMS.

The programs run for rehabilitating abusive men through the courts? Bancroft DESIGNED THEM. His programs are replicated ALL OVER THE WORLD.
He literally wrote THE book on abuser rehabilitation.

Here’s a link to a pdf copy. If you haven’t read this book yet, read this book.

Can we talk about how it seems like the entirety of the book is online on PDF, this making it accessible to anyone with an internet connection?

That is how we stop abuse.

We enable everyone to know what it looks like, so that when it happens, they can shut it down.

Arm yrself with knowledge!

Changed my life, would reccomend.

I am reblogging about this book YET AGAIN because this book is THAT IMPORTANT. Read it, you will not regret it.

that link doesn’t work anymore, but here’s one that does

nympheline:

This is my favourite bookstore and bookseller in the world. Bar none.
I used to get to Seattle every six months or so, and whenever I visited I always made it a priority to stop in BLMF and ask its keeper what he’d been reading lately. He possessed an inexhaustible memory, a comfortable lack of snobbery, and impeccable taste. The first book he recommended to me, upon listening gravely to my litany of at-the-moment authors (Barbara Kingsolver, James Clavell, Maeve Binchy, Neil Gaiman, Charles DeLint, Anthony Bourdain) was Tipping the Velvet. He also later landed me with Geek Love, Anno Dracula, half the Aubreyad, and more modern Literature-with-a-capital-L than I could carry home.
The next-to-last time I dropped in, I asked if he had any P. G. Wodehouse.
"I have zero Wodehouse," he said, "and here’s why…"
Turned out that some fiend had taken to creeping in every month or so expressly to inquire of any Wodehouse and, once led to the volumes, to buy it all. ALL. Didn’t matter the condition, the edition, or whether he had another just like it in his possession; the villain bought every single P. G. Wodehouse in stock, every single time.
Was he a fan more comprehensive, more truly fanatical than any other I’d heard of, let alone known? Was he virulently anti-Wodehouse, only purchasing the books to keep their wry poison from infecting the impressionable masses? The world may never know.
I didn’t get any Wodehouse then, and I didn’t really feel the lack. I found plenty of other treasures that trip. But here’s one reason why BLMF and its proprietor are my favourite of their kind: that was two years ago, you see. Maybe three. In all that interim, I never planted foot in that bookshop. Never called. Never wrote. And I’m one face out of hundreds of thousands, dear reader; one reader he saw twice a year for three years, then not again for another three.
But I walked in the shop last Friday. Nodded hello.
"Can I help you find anything?" he asked, lifting his head from the phone.
"No, I’m good," I said.
"Wait—hold on a second." He set the phone down, walked ‘round the towers of books balanced precariously on the desk, on the floor, and atop other, only slightly less precarious towers. He jerked his head conspiratorially toward the far end of the shop, led me carefully to a shelf way in the back, removed a tattered stack of mass market paperbacks and motioned me closer to see what they’d been hiding.
Fifteen pristine Wodehouses: crisp, heavy, and—
“Hardcover,” he said, and waggled his eyebrows.
Reader, I bought them all.

nympheline:

This is my favourite bookstore and bookseller in the world. Bar none.

I used to get to Seattle every six months or so, and whenever I visited I always made it a priority to stop in BLMF and ask its keeper what he’d been reading lately. He possessed an inexhaustible memory, a comfortable lack of snobbery, and impeccable taste. The first book he recommended to me, upon listening gravely to my litany of at-the-moment authors (Barbara Kingsolver, James Clavell, Maeve Binchy, Neil Gaiman, Charles DeLint, Anthony Bourdain) was Tipping the Velvet. He also later landed me with Geek Love, Anno Dracula, half the Aubreyad, and more modern Literature-with-a-capital-L than I could carry home.

The next-to-last time I dropped in, I asked if he had any P. G. Wodehouse.

"I have zero Wodehouse," he said, "and here’s why…"

Turned out that some fiend had taken to creeping in every month or so expressly to inquire of any Wodehouse and, once led to the volumes, to buy it all. ALL. Didn’t matter the condition, the edition, or whether he had another just like it in his possession; the villain bought every single P. G. Wodehouse in stock, every single time.

Was he a fan more comprehensive, more truly fanatical than any other I’d heard of, let alone known? Was he virulently anti-Wodehouse, only purchasing the books to keep their wry poison from infecting the impressionable masses? The world may never know.

I didn’t get any Wodehouse then, and I didn’t really feel the lack. I found plenty of other treasures that trip. But here’s one reason why BLMF and its proprietor are my favourite of their kind: that was two years ago, you see. Maybe three. In all that interim, I never planted foot in that bookshop. Never called. Never wrote. And I’m one face out of hundreds of thousands, dear reader; one reader he saw twice a year for three years, then not again for another three.

But I walked in the shop last Friday. Nodded hello.

"Can I help you find anything?" he asked, lifting his head from the phone.

"No, I’m good," I said.

"Wait—hold on a second." He set the phone down, walked ‘round the towers of books balanced precariously on the desk, on the floor, and atop other, only slightly less precarious towers. He jerked his head conspiratorially toward the far end of the shop, led me carefully to a shelf way in the back, removed a tattered stack of mass market paperbacks and motioned me closer to see what they’d been hiding.

Fifteen pristine Wodehouses: crisp, heavy, and—

Hardcover,” he said, and waggled his eyebrows.

Reader, I bought them all.

consummateclassicsconnoisseur:

Saying adults cannot read YA Literature because it was not written for that age group is like saying teens cannot read Classic Literature because it was not written for our age group.

webgeekist:

hatikarat:

Hi. So I saw this post  and I feel like the reddit link there might interest you because of your previous discussions on how fandom can influence the media they consume or want to consume, and this might be an example of that, though it was used in a devious (some might say evil) way. 

Oh my god the wANK.

On the one hand, this is probably the best example of FANDOM influencing MEDIA I have ever, ever seen.  If this story is to be believed, the Twilight fandom basically just fucked the world over by putting a total piece of trash on the bestseller list singlehandedly lifted a piece of ripoff fanfic to the #1 bestseller of…what is it, all-time?

On the other hand…omg, fandom, WHY DID YOU DO THIS TO US?  THAT BOOK IS TOTAL SHIT.

But seriously, read that article.  It’s…kind of staggering.  And yes, thank you hatikarat for bringing that to my attention, because it really is relevant to all the rants I have ever ranted…and it also scares the shit out of me.